Watch Again

Titanoboa: Monster Snake: Teaser

Watch More
back to video

Titanoboa: Monster Snake: Teaser

Short | 01:27

In the pantheon of predators, it's one of the greatest discoveries since the T-Rex: a snake 48 feet long, weighing in at 2,500 pounds.

More About This show

In the pantheon of predators, it's one of the greatest discoveries since the T-Rex: a snake 48 feet long, weighing in at 2,500 pounds. Uncovered from a treasure trove of fossils in a Colombian coal mine, this serpent is revealing a lost world of giant creatures. Travel back to the period following the extinction of dinosaurs and encounter this monster predator.

Bios

  • Dr. Jason Head<span>Assistant Professor of Vertebrate Paleontology</span>
  • Edwin Cadena<SPAN> Graduate Student and Smithsonian Fellow</SPAN>
  • Dr. Jonathan Bloch<span>Associate Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology</span>
  • Dr. Carlos Jaramillo<SPAN> Paleobotanist</SPAN>
  • Alex Hastings<span>Graduate Student</span>
  • Fabiany Herrera<SPAN>Graduate Student and Smithsonian Fellow</SPAN>
  • Dr. P David Polly<SPAN> Vertebrate Paleontologist</SPAN>
  • Dr. Jason Head<span>Assistant Professor of Vertebrate Paleontology</span>

    Dr. Jason HeadAssistant Professor of Vertebrate Paleontology

    Read Full Bio
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    Jason Head is a vertebrate paleontologist and herpetologist specializing in the evolution of reptiles and its relationship to climate change. In addition to researching the world's largest snake, the 60 million year old Titanoboa cerrejonensis, Jason described Sanajeh indicus, a fossil snake that preserves evidence of predation on baby dinosaurs, and developed a method to estimate environmental changes from the reptile fossil record.

    Jason has conducted fieldwork in Colombia, Uruguay, Pakistan, India, Jordan, Tanzania, Mali, and North America. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he resides with a python named Socrates and his fiance, anthropologist Naomi Leite.

Buy This Show

Now, you can watch Smithsonian Channel's incredible documentaries and shows anytime you want by purchasing from any of these distributors:

Download

Return to Video Page